2015 Reading Book 14 – 8 Sandpiper Way by Debbie Macomber

Synopsis:

Dear Reader,

I have something to confide in you. I think my husband, Dave, might be having an affair. I found an earring in his pocket, and it’s not mine. I’m also worried because some jewelry was recently stolen from an old woman—and Dave used to visit her a lot.

You see, he’s a pastor. And a good man. I can’t believe he’s guilty of anything, but why won’t he tell me where he’s been when he comes home so late?

Reader, I’d love to hear what you think. I also want to tell you what’s going on with your other friends in Cedar Cove.

Like Sheriff Troy Davis, to mention one. His long-ago love, Faith Beckwith, just moved here!

So come on in and join me for a cup of tea.

Emily Flemming

Quick Thoughts
If you have been around this blog long, you will know I really enjoy Debbie Macomber novels. I had been focussing on reading her new series, Rose Harbour, when I realised I hadn’t finished Cedar Cove. I’m really fortunate that my local library now has an e-book service, and the Cedar Cove series is part of it, so I have been using that to read this series.

As ever, I enjoyed this novel. Each story focuses on a different member of the community, with some stories crossing over to the next novel. This time, we followed the story of Pastor Flemming – a man keeping a shameful secret; plus there is a mystery to solve – who stole the jewellery? This book didn’t take me long to read. I am always drawn into the novels and can read them for hours at a time. This for me is easy reading; guilt-free chick lit!

Rating: 3 out of 5

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Addition: Paperback
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 3 out of 5
Synopsis:

Venice, 1681. Glassblowing is the lifeblood of the Republic, and Venetian mirrors are more precious than gold. Jealously guarded by the murderous Council of Ten, the glassblowers of Murano are virtually imprisoned on their island in the lagoon. But the greatest of the artists, Corradino Manin, sells his methods and his soul to the Sun King, Louis XIV of France, to protect his secret daughter. In the present day his descendant, Leonora Manin, leaves an unhappy life in London to begin a new one as a glassblower in Venice. As she finds new life and love in her adoptive city, her fate becomes inextricably linked with that of her ancestor and the treacherous secrets of his life begin to come to light.

This is book number four off my Mount TBR List. This book has been sitting on my shelf for ages, and when I discovered by husband’s Nan used to be a glassblower, I was even more eager to read it. However, this book wasn’t really what I expected.

The story is set in both the 1600s and the present day. Normally, I like novels which jump between time periods – novels written by the likes of Rachel Hore or Kate Morton. Yet, this story just didn’t grip me like the stories from those two authors do.

The story follows the Manin family – Leonora in the present day and Corradino in the 1600s. Both are glassblowers, and both are very talented. Yet Corradino sells his secrets to France to save his daughter, and Leonora, running away from a disappointing life in London, seeks to find out about her family history and to clear Corradino’s name.

As I write this, I find myself wondering what exactly about the book I didn’t really enjoy, and I’m not sure. I didn’t really like any of the characters, which isn’t always a problem for me if I find the story enjoyable. Yet I found the storyline a bit boring. There could have been more of a sense of danger in Corradino’s time, but there wasn’t. I knew The Ten were a force to not be messed with, but I didn’t feel fearful of them. As for Leonora, I found her a bit annoying. She seemed to be seeking validation – from her work, from her possible boyfriend and from her family legacy. I guess I didn’t really warm to her so her neediness annoyed me instead of making me root for her.

I’m rating this book 3 out of 5, which is a sign I didn’t hate it! I have been fairly negative about this novel so far, but I read it to the end and I did want to know what happened to Corradino. This novel is essentially a love story, which a historical mystery woven into it. This isn’t the worst book I have read this year. It didn’t take long to read, and I whatever I thought about the writing or the characters, I did want to know what was going to happen. This wasn’t what I expected, and it wasn’t as good as I had hoped it would be; however, it was an alright read.

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2015 Reading Book 13 – The Fountain by Mary Nichols

Synopsis:

Worn down by several years of marriage, Barbara feels she has lost all the vitality of her youth. But her old friend Simon is not prepared to let Barbara lose sight of the woman she really is – the woman he has always loved. He reawakens Barbara’s passion and fighting spirit – but at what cost?

Quick Thoughts
This is the third book off my Mount TBR Challenge that I have read. I was looking forward to reading it as I enjoyed Nichols’ novel The Summer House (it was one of my top reads in 2011), yet I found this novel to be a complete disappointment. I didn’t like the storyline and I didn’t like the characters. For me, this was essentially a book about adultery and I didn’t enjoy it. I only finished this book because it is on my Mount TBR Challenge. I can’t think of a positive thing to say about this story really. This isn’t a happy read; I did not like reading about this unhappy marriage and the unfaithfulness of both spouses; and (this is a very trival point!) the story is called The Fountain, yet that doesn’t feature until right at the end of the book!

Rating: 2 out of 5

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2015 Reading Book 12 – Sea of Lost Love by Santa Montefiore

Synopsis:

Celestria Montague always spends her summers at Pendrift Hall, the rambling, shabby mansion adorned with wisteria and clematis that has been home to the Montague family for generations. It is 1958, and the family is celebrating her father’s fiftieth birthday at a lavish ball. The celebratory night ends in death and tragedy, however, and young Celestria learns that the family may lose Pendrift Hall. Her grandfather urges Celestria to play detective, to solve the mysteries surrounding the night’s events, and to save the ancient mansion if at all possible. Her quest takes her to Italy’s rugged and beautiful Puglia, and into the dark, cool cloisters of the Convento di Santa Maria del Mare. Here Celestria meets an enigmatic stranger and confronts unwelcome truths about her family — and herself.

Quick Thoughts:
This is the second novel by Santa Montefiore I have read, and another that I have enjoyed. I found the story engaging and I wanted to solve the mystery. I like Montefiore’s writing style and I like the novels she writes. I like a book that changes location, and although I’ve never been to Italy, I do enjoy novels that are set there. There is more than one storyline that runs throughout this novel and I was gripped from start to finish.

Rating: 4 out of 5

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I haven’t done a Recommended Author post in a long time, but today I wanted to change that!

recommended authors

The author I am recommending is: Katy Hollway!

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Katy has released two books so far; The Times of Kerim and The Days of Eliora. These are the first two books in the Remnant Chronicles series. Katy’s books are young adult, Christian books and I have really enjoyed both of them. Her writing is engaging and draws you in – with both novels I found myself reading huge chunks in one go as I wanted to know what would happen. I have found Katy’s writing to be like Frank Peretti, which is a big compliment as although I have only read one of his books, I really enjoyed it. If you like young adult fiction, if you like fantasy fiction, and if you like Christian fiction, than Katy is definitely worth checking out!

You can find out more about Katy Hollway and read the first three chapters of The Days of Eliora at her website, www.katyhollway.com

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Addition: E-book
Genre: Chick-lit, historical fiction
Rating: 3 out of 5
Synopsis:

Ashcombe was the most beautiful house Saskia had ever seen as a little girl. A rambling pink cottage on the edge of the Suffolk village of Melbury Green, its enchanting garden provided a fairy-tale playground of seclusion, a perfect sanctuary to hide from the tragedy which shattered her childhood.

Now an adult, Saskia is still living at Ashcombe and as a book restorer devotes her days tending to the broken, battered books that find their way to her, daydreaming about the people who had once turned their pages. When she discovers a notebook carefully concealed in an old Bible – and realising someone has gone to a great deal of trouble to hide a story of their own – Saskia finds herself drawn into a heart-rending tale of wartime love…

As you may know, I love Erica James novels! There are only a couple I haven’t read, and I am hoping to read them soon (as well as all the other books I own and haven’t read yet…!) I was excited to read this novel, and I of course enjoyed it!

This is one of my favourite types of novels – set in the present, and set in the past. It had a hint of Rachel Hore and Kate Morton in the writing style – two other authors I really like! I don’t want to give too much away as the synopsis is quite cryptic, but I liked how we jumped from the present day and Saskia’s story, into the diary and WW2. Again, I don’t want to give away too much, but the book felt very well-timed, considering the films which have recently been released.

This novel follows two love stories. I found the story in the diary more gripping than Saskia’s present day story. I struggled a little bit with Saskia. She suffered such a tragic event as a child, but now as an adult her life hasn’t moved on. In many ways, she reminded me of a moody teenager. Even right at the end of the novel, she was still stubborn and I found her hard work. I loved her family though. They had given everything up for her, to try and bring some normality and security into her lost childhood. I loved both her Grandad’s – they were funny and sweet. They made me miss my two Grandad’s, who are sadly not with us anymore.

Like I said, I preferred the story in the diary. I wanted to learn more about the characters and the lives they were leading during WW2. I really enjoyed the historical storyline. I was sucked in and desperate to learn more. It felt relevant and was really engaging. The story was tinged with sadness and the struggle for identity. There was an element of fear and I was hooked.

This isn’t my favourite Erica James book, but it was another novel I have enjoyed. I didn’t like this book as much as her last novel, Summer at the Lake, which is why I am only rating this book 3 out of 5. Erica James writes excellent novels, and there was a lot in this book to recommend it. There are two love stories, there is the search for identity and a study into our families and how as we strive to protect someone we can in fact trap them; and the highlight for me was the diary and the story set in WW2. This is another Erica James novel that I would recommend.

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Addition: Paperback
Genre: Young adult, fantasy
Rating: 3 out of 5
Synopsis:

Fall under the spell of Wake—the first book in an achingly beautiful new series by celebrated author Amanda Hocking—and lose yourself to the Watersong.

Gorgeous. Fearless. Dangerous. They’re the kind of girls you envy; the kind of girls you want to hate. Strangers in town for the summer, Penn, Lexi and Thea have caught everyone’s attention—but it’s Gemma who’s attracted theirs. She’s the one they’ve chosen to be part of their group.

Gemma seems to have it all—she’s carefree, pretty, and falling in love with Alex, the boy next door. He’s always been just a friend, but this summer they’ve taken their relationship to the next level, and now there’s no going back. Then one night, Gemma’s ordinary life changes forever. She’s taking a late night swim under the stars when she finds Penn, Lexi and Thea partying on the cove. They invite her to join them, and the next morning she wakes up on the beach feeling groggy and sick, knowing something is different.

Suddenly Gemma is stronger, faster, and more beautiful than ever. But her new powers come with a terrifying price. And as she uncovers the truth, she’s is forced to choose between staying with those she loves—or entering a new world brimming with dark hungers and unimaginable secrets.

This is the first book in the Watersong series by Amanda Hocking. A few years ago I read Hocking’s Trylle series and really enjoyed it, so I had quite high expectations for this book. I was also nervous, I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy this book, which would have been sad as I liked the Trylle series so much.

This book follows Gemma, a sixteen year old girl who loves swimming. Her beauty and natural ability in the water attract the attention of three girls – Penn, Thea and Lexi. These girls are newcomers to the town, and their stunning beauty is making the town nervous. Gemma is cautious of them, but during a late night swim she is convinced to join them in the cove. She wakes the next morning having no memory of the night before, but knows something has changed – she has changed. What does this mean for her and her future?

I am pleased to write that I enjoyed this book. Maybe not as much as the Trylle series, but enough to read it in two sittings! This book is gripping, and pulled me in straight away. It is an easy read, but enjoyable. I liked the characters and I liked the story. This is a young adult novel, but as an adult I enjoyed it.

I liked Gemma and her sister Harper. I felt for Harper, she just wanted to protect Gemma. I found the storyline with their Mother a bit odd, and I’m not sure it added much to the book. Their Father seemed to be a sweetheart. Hard-working and trying hard to look after his girls. I think I forgot that Gemma is on sixteen, she seemed more mature than that. I liked the boys written into the story as well. Daniel made me chuckle as he humoured Harper, and Alex just seemed very sweet.

The storyline was good. This is the first in a four book series, so it took a little longer to get going than usual but I didn’t mind the scene-setting. I quickly worked out what fantasy characters the three girls are, but I enjoyed watching the story unfold. There were bits that were a little bit more gory than I expected, but that didn’t bother me much. The story is gripping, there are a couple of mysteries throughout the story, and of course there are a couple of romances too.

I don’t have anything bad to say about this book, except that it isn’t the best book I have ever read. I may have rated this book higher if this was the first Hocking book I had read, however this was a good read. Like I have said, I read it very quickly and I did enjoy it.

I didn’t enjoy this book as much as I enjoyed the Trylle series, however I liked it enough to buy the second book in the series. I am rating this book 3 out of 5.

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2015 Reading Book 11 – The Quiche of Death by M C Beaton

Synopsis:

Agatha Raisin has moved to a picture-book English village away from London public relations bustle, and wants to get in the swing. So she buys herself a quiche for the village quiche-making contest and is more than alarmed when it kills a judge. Hot on the trail of the poisoner, Agatha is fearless, all the while unaware, that she’s become the next victim.

Quick Thoughts
This is the first book in the Agatha Raisin series. I got it out of the library because I watched the TV adaptation of it and really enjoyed it. I found that I liked the book just as much! This is the first novel by M.C. Beaton that I have read and I was gripped from the beginning. Of course, I knew the outcome but that didn’t spoil the book for me. I have just taken out the library the second Agatha Raisin book, which I am looking forward to reading.

Rating: 4 out of 5

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2015 Reading Number 10 – Matilda by Roald Dahl

Synopsis:

Matilda is a sweet, exceptional young girl, but her parents think she’s just a nuisance. She expects school to be different but there she has to face Miss Trunchbull, a kid-hating terror of a headmistress. When Matilda is attacked by the Trunchbull she suddenly discovers she has a remarkable power with which to fight back. It’ll take a superhuman genius to give Miss Trunchbull what she deserves and Matilda may be just the one to do it!

Quick Thoughts
This isn’t the first time I have read Matilda, it was a book I loved as a child, and I am pleased to say I enjoyed it just as much as an adult! The book is fun, a little bit naughty and funny. Roald Dahl sucks you in and you find yourself cheering Matilda on. I remember enjoying the film as a child too, plus a couple of years ago I saw the musical on the West End and loved that too. There is nothing to dislike with this book!

Rating:5 out of 5

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2015 Reading Book 9 – Rose Harbour in Bloom by Debbie Macomber

Synopsis:
Since moving to Cedar Cove, Jo Marie Rose has truly started to feel at home, and her neighbors have become her closest friends. Now it’s springtime, and Jo Marie is eager to finish the most recent addition to her inn. In memory of her late husband, Paul, she has designed a beautiful rose garden for the property and enlisted handyman Mark Taylor to help realize it. She and Mark don’t always see eye-to-eye—and at times he seems far removed—yet deep down, Jo Marie finds great comfort in his company. And while she still seeks a sense of closure, she welcomes her latest guests, who are on their own healing journeys.

Annie Newton arrives in town to orchestrate her grandparents’ fiftieth wedding anniversary celebration. While Annie is excited for the festivities, she’s struggling to move on from her broken engagement, and her grandparents themselves seem to be having trouble getting along. Worse, Annie is forced to see Oliver Sutton, with whom she grew up and who has always mercilessly teased her. But the best parties end with a surprise, and Annie is in for the biggest one of all.

High-powered businesswoman Mary Smith, another Rose Harbor Inn guest, has achieved incredible success in her field, yet serious illness has led her to face her sole, lingering regret. Almost nineteen years ago, she ended her relationship with her true love, George Hudson, and now she’s returned to Cedar Cove to make amends.

Compassion and joy await Jo Marie, Annie, and Mary as they make peace with their pasts and look boldly toward their futures. Rose Harbor in Bloom is Debbie Macomber at her heartwarming best.

Quick Thoughts
I received this book from Netgalley to give an honest review.

This is the second book in the Rose Harbour series. If you know me at all, you will know I love Debbie Macomber‘s books and was very excited to read this one. As ever, I really enjoyed it! The story quickly sucked me in. I love the characters – Jo Marie is such a lovely woman – and I enjoyed walking through this time with her. This story is quite predictable but I didn’t mind that, it is chick-lit and it is heart warming. It didn’t take me long to get drawn in and I didn’t want to put the book down. I enjoy this series so much I have the next book, Love Letters, on my shelf waiting to be read!

Rating: 4 out of 5

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